Human Factors Engineering 101

We’re pleased to be presenting again at the Medical Device School in London, UK, later in November.  Matthew once again joins a panel of industry peers to provide delegates to the School with both an introduction to the world of Human Factors Engineering for Medical Devices and the opportunity for a practical application of HFE principles.

If you haven’t yet had an opportunity to find out what it’s like to work with us, here’s a taster from two previous sessions:

Regulators and developers from across the EU, the Middle East and Baltic countries gathered together at the Autumn 2015 Medical Device School, in London. In just 50 minutes, in addition to exposing the fundamental importance of Human Factors, Matthew outlined the key steps they are expected to take along the development journey. Concluding with a Q and A segment, attendees commented:

crowd“For me, one of the most important sessions of the school

“I particularly liked that human factors was covered in detail”

“Excellent presentation”

For the April 2016 session of the School, the organisers asked Matthew to include two sessions. Delegate feedback about the whole Autumn school asked for more interactive elements, so our second session would give them practical experience of several of the key steps along their usability journey. With that in mind, we would focus on something that everyone would be familiar with and allowed them to get to grips with applying concepts immediately.

As before, our first session started by explaining why Human Factors is important, before moving on to share what is involved in a good Usability programme for device development. wide eyedThought provoking images underlined steps on the journey, interwoven with stories gathered from experiences in the field. At the climax of an account of one usability study, you could feel the collective wince as Matthew described a patient’s long term practice with Type A needles (which are supposed to be single use). To finish, participants attained an insight into how all of this fits together with other paths in development.

“Great insight into the detail involved and how I can get started”

“Brilliant and easy to talk to. Really good interactive activities”

How easy is it to make a cup of tea?A quick leg stretch and freshening of coffee mugs later, we dived straight into putting this newfound approach to work. Over the course of three group activities, the room was plunged into the world of making a cup of tea. Sounds straightforward? It was. Until, that is, they became exposed to the challenges faced by someone with impaired vision and arthritis, walking a while in their shoes. How difficult it became to perform an everyday task!

“A great way to get inside the heads of our users and understand things from their point of view”

“Workshops were very energetic and welcomed”

“Excellent, very well paced, good practical demonstrations”

meeting penThis newfound sense of place enabled them to work on defining User Needs and extending that knowledge towards risk analysis, teasing out some of the less obvious use related risks. When it came to ideas for ways to mitigate these problems, creativity and appreciation for a different view of the world resulted in some unusual solutions.

The conversation continued over lunch. Delegates were talking about how they could use what they’d just learned when they got back to the work environment.

“I’d like to steal your first workshop, because it’ll explain to our teams why and how we can think like the people we’re making it for”

“I got a better understanding of how to apply this to manage my risks”

“I know now what we should be doing, and who to call for expert help”

You can achieve similar results.  Get in touch to find out how you can benefit from this or other training courses we have delivered.

 

 

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