Welcome to the team, Mike

We are pleased to welcome a new member to our team – Mike Heald.  Several of the team have worked with Mike on a number of projects over the years, so it’s great to be able to work with him again.

Equipped with an aerospace engineering background and a degree in Medical Engineering, Mike started leading the development of medical devices and combination products more than 12 years ago.  Over that time, he has worked principally in the development of drug delivery devices of varying complexity for the pharmaceutical industry.  Mike blends Engineering with real-world experience, Project Management, Quality and Regulatory knowledge to deliver effective and pragmatic medical device development.

“Medical Device development is never a handle turning exercise.  There are three major protagonists to be looked after; Engineering, Regulation and Stakeholders, and they can all spring surprises at any time.  The stakeholders lean on you all the way, the engineering is always visible but has a sense of mischief, and then the Regulations jump up to bite you near the end.  In my experience the attention this trio receives is often unbalanced with Regulations taking a back seat and Engineering detail trusted to do the right thing.  I see it as my job to restore this balance and help to keep those stakeholders happy all the way to delivery.”

So this is Christmas…

Where did that year go?  Seems like only a few weeks since we were at the start of 2017, so much has happened.

We would like to take this opportunity to wish all of our friends, colleagues and clients a great Christmas, New Year and a wonderful start to 2018.

Christmas baubles smaller

Our offices are closed after 21st December 2017, re-opening on 9th January 2018.  2018 begins with some news about our team.

See you next year!

Human Factors Engineering 101

We’re pleased to be presenting again at the Medical Device School in London, UK, later in November.  Matthew once again joins a panel of industry peers to provide delegates to the School with both an introduction to the world of Human Factors Engineering for Medical Devices and the opportunity for a practical application of HFE principles.

If you haven’t yet had an opportunity to find out what it’s like to work with us, here’s a taster from two previous sessions:

Regulators and developers from across the EU, the Middle East and Baltic countries gathered together at the Autumn 2015 Medical Device School, in London. In just 50 minutes, in addition to exposing the fundamental importance of Human Factors, Matthew outlined the key steps they are expected to take along the development journey. Concluding with a Q and A segment, attendees commented:

crowd“For me, one of the most important sessions of the school

“I particularly liked that human factors was covered in detail”

“Excellent presentation”

For the April 2016 session of the School, the organisers asked Matthew to include two sessions. Delegate feedback about the whole Autumn school asked for more interactive elements, so our second session would give them practical experience of several of the key steps along their usability journey. With that in mind, we would focus on something that everyone would be familiar with and allowed them to get to grips with applying concepts immediately.

As before, our first session started by explaining why Human Factors is important, before moving on to share what is involved in a good Usability programme for device development. wide eyedThought provoking images underlined steps on the journey, interwoven with stories gathered from experiences in the field. At the climax of an account of one usability study, you could feel the collective wince as Matthew described a patient’s long term practice with Type A needles (which are supposed to be single use). To finish, participants attained an insight into how all of this fits together with other paths in development.

“Great insight into the detail involved and how I can get started”

“Brilliant and easy to talk to. Really good interactive activities”

How easy is it to make a cup of tea?A quick leg stretch and freshening of coffee mugs later, we dived straight into putting this newfound approach to work. Over the course of three group activities, the room was plunged into the world of making a cup of tea. Sounds straightforward? It was. Until, that is, they became exposed to the challenges faced by someone with impaired vision and arthritis, walking a while in their shoes. How difficult it became to perform an everyday task!

“A great way to get inside the heads of our users and understand things from their point of view”

“Workshops were very energetic and welcomed”

“Excellent, very well paced, good practical demonstrations”

meeting penThis newfound sense of place enabled them to work on defining User Needs and extending that knowledge towards risk analysis, teasing out some of the less obvious use related risks. When it came to ideas for ways to mitigate these problems, creativity and appreciation for a different view of the world resulted in some unusual solutions.

The conversation continued over lunch. Delegates were talking about how they could use what they’d just learned when they got back to the work environment.

“I’d like to steal your first workshop, because it’ll explain to our teams why and how we can think like the people we’re making it for”

“I got a better understanding of how to apply this to manage my risks”

“I know now what we should be doing, and who to call for expert help”

You can achieve similar results.  Get in touch to find out how you can benefit from this or other training courses we have delivered.

 

 

Updated – fifteen things you need to know about the Medical Device Regulation

Update: Since we first published the 15 things, the Medical Device Regulation has moved on apace:

  • The MDR was approved by the European Parliament on 5 April 2017
  • The MDR was published in the Official Journal of the EU on 5 May 2017 and came into force on 25 May 2017

While the detailed MDR text is of interest to people working within regulatory affairs, everyone else probably wants to find out “what does it mean for me?”

So, here are 15 things you need to know about the MDR:

Thing 1.

You will need to consider how your device / technology / combination product is managed throughout it’s life-cycle, as the MDR proposes a broader focus than the pre-approval view taken by the Medical Devices Directive. This means that you will have to follow up on quality, performance and safety of devices after they are placed on the market

Thing 2.

Catching up with the Pharmaceutical regulations, where the role of the Qualified Person has been required for some years, you’ll be required to have a “responsible person” within your organisation, to safeguard regulatory compliance

Thing 3.

Unique Device Identifiers will be introduced, similar to the system in place for the US market

Thing 4.

The role of your Notified Body will evolve from being an industry “helper” to an extension of competent authorities’ market surveillance apparatus. They will have to complete a rigorous application process before re-achieving Notified Body status and will be monitored for both competence and ethical operation

Thing 5.

You will be subject to unannounced audits from your Notified Body at least every 5 years. These audits will cover not just the medical device manufacturer, but also their suppliers and sub-contractors

Thing 6.

You’ll have two Regulations to comply with, instead of 3 Directives (let alone the 28 different pieces of national legislation to enact them in member states) and at least 4 guidances (MEDDEVs)

Thing 7.

A higher bar for clinical data looks likely for lower risk medical devices, equivalence won’t be commonly available as a route to demonstrate clinical safety or performance. For implantable and Class III devices, clinical investigations are likely to be the norm

Thing 8.

You’ll have a specific regulatory body to deal with for expert review of your submissions for higher risk devices, the Medical Device Coordination Group

Thing 9.

Those products you have classified as “accessories” at the moment will become medical devices, if they’re used with cleaning, disinfection or sterilisation medical devices

Thing 10.

Devices like coloured cosmetic contact lenses, without a medical purpose but with characteristics similar to medical devices, will fall within the scope of MDR

Thing 11.

Should you be in the unfortunate position where injured patients or their representatives are seeking compensation for a defective medical device, the technical documentation you produced to demonstrate conformity can be shared by authorities with patients or their representatives

Thing 12.

If you aren’t already, you will be required to use a Quality Management system

Thing 13.

The Essential Requirements have grown, so you’ll probably want to review and update your Essential Requirements checklist

Thing 14.

Medical devices look likely to be labelled as such, similarly to that already required for an In-vitro Diagnostic device. This could lead to a new “MD” symbol being defined

Thing 15.

You have some time to get ready, even though the Regulation is now law in the EU. It is probably a good idea to become familiar with the changes so you’re not playing catch up with your competitors and the regulators.

  • The MDR and IVDR were approved by the European Parliament on 5 April 2017
  • The MDR and IVDR were published in the Official Journal of the EU on 5 May 2017 and came into force on 25 May 2017
  • There’s a transition period of three years for the MDR, so until May 2020.  Compliance with the MDR becomes mandatory.
  • Similarly, for the IVDR, there’s a five year transition period until May 2022.

What next?

Now that you’ve read the 15 things you need to know, you may find it helpful to talk with someone about what you’ll be doing differently for your upcoming projects, existing processes and quality systems.

Give us a call or send an email to start the discussion,